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TAZKIRAH

Pronounced by world-fame scholars : "most successful and universal Law of nation building"; "Exposition of infallible and divine sociology";"solitary oasis in barren literature of religions"; "a Monumental Work,"--(Royal Society of Arts).




"Tazkirah", Mashriqi's most powerful book, was designed to appear in ten volumes, six of which had already been completed when the first one was published in 1924. Mashriqi suspended publication of the remaining volumes and started The Khaksar Movement, with social service to all, and military drill as its main features. "Tazkirah" is a higher commentary on the Quran, which he describes as the last Message of God to man. It contains an exhaustive exposition of the Divine Law, what he calls the Religion of Nature, which governs the rise and fall of nations and civilizations. The first volume of "Tazkirah" has four sections. The first, which is in Arabic, constitutes the author's main theorem on the rise and fall of human societies, and a verdict on the fluctuating fortune of the world Muslim community. The section following the Arabic text are in Urdu and consist of 132-pages Preface, a 100-page Introduction, and a 172-page text of the book proper. The Introduction deals with the Quranic version of the law of the man's evolution as a species and the collective conduct of human societies determining their ultimate destiny. The Preface, which precedes, discusses the conflict between various religions, the distortion of the Message brought by prophets, the tussle between Religion and Science, and the compelling necessity to resolve these conflicts before mankind becomes extinct through its own follies.

Even when analyzing the fate of human communities and man's ultimate destiny, Mashriqi has looked on everything as a mathematician. It was as a mathematician that he discussed in 1926 the theme with Einstein on his return from Cairo via Germany, and tried to impress upon him to come out of the shell of a mere physicist. In his address to the mathematical society of Islamia College Peshawar in November 1928 - a decade and a half before he had been the principal of the college - he made a particular reference to it. He said, "If I have presented a book (Tazkirah) to the world that has no peer it is because of mathematics. If I had left mathematics and gone on to higher things it is through mathematics. If I have left studying mathematics and have seen a higher truth in the Koran it is through mathematics. In fact, the first truth of the Koran dawned on me while I was busy day and night preparing for the Mathematics Tripos at Cambridge".

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